Gluten-free Bagels

One of my saddest moments when going gluten-free was the realization that I could no longer have chewy, doughy, cream-cheese-smeared bagels. ¬†No more bagel shop dates with my nephews (ok, I think that only happened twice), and no more bagels at church on “bagel Sunday” (lucky for me, I now go to a different church since marrying and relocating, so I no longer have to mourn over THAT loss! ūüôā ). ¬†Early in my learning to live without gluten, I knew I’d have to find a way to make bagels. ¬†The recipe I based my recipe on was based on a recipe from livingwithout.com (did you get all that? ¬†In other words, my recipe is 3rd generation).

Since bagel making is a bit of a process, I make a nice large batch of dough.  These bagels freeze wonderfully.  So I suggest you make now, eat later.

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You’ll need…

2 cups sorghum flour

1 cup brown rice flour

1 cup corn starch

1 cup tapioca starch

1 cup ground flax seed

2 Tbsp. xanthan gum

3 tsp. salt

2 Tbsp. yeast

4 Tbsp. honey

2 1/2 cups warm water

2 tsp. apple cider vinegar

4 Tbsp. canola oil

You’ll also need…

large pot with at least 5-6″ of water

1 Tbsp of molasses (or honey if you don’t have molasses on hand)

extra canola oil for greasing your hands when forming the bagels

desired toppings – sesame seeds, poppy seeds, coarse salt, cinnamon and sugar… you choose!

Making the bagels…

Preheat your oven to around 100 degrees, then shut off (this will create a nice “proof box” for your bagels to rise.

Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.

In the bowl of your stand mixer, combine the dry ingredients.

In a small bowl, combine yeast, warm water, and honey. ¬†Set aside for 5-10 minutes to do it’s thing.

Once the yeast mixture has “come alive” and gotten frothy, add the apple cider vinegar and canola oil.

Turn your stand mixer on to its lowest speed, and slowly pour in the wet ingredients.

Mix until wet and dry ingredients are incorporated.

Then, mix at a medium speed for 3-4 minutes.

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Grease your hands with the extra canola oil. ¬†Split your dough into individual servings. ¬†*NOTE: ¬†If you like bakeshop-sized bagels, this recipe will make 8 large bagels. ¬†Personally, I like my carbs in smaller amounts, so I make my bagels 1/2 size… a perfect portion for me. ¬†This all depends on personal preference. ¬†The easiest way to split your dough is to score it with your finger in an asterisk shape. ¬†Then, if you’d like to make 16 bagels, take each of the 8 segments and split them in half.

Grease your hands as needed, and form each of the portions of dough into a bagel shape. ¬†I’ve found the easiest way to do this is to create a ball of dough, stick your finger through the middle, and while your finger is in the dough, kind of twirl it around. ¬†Then you can remove the dough from your finger and continue to smooth it into a bagel shape.

Place each bagel onto the parchment-lined baking sheets.  They will rise a bit, so be sure to give them space!

Place the baking sheets into your warm oven. ¬†Allow bagels to rise for 40-50 minutes, or until they’ve nearly doubled in size.

While the bagels are rising, bring your pot of water to a rolling boil and add the molasses or honey.  Stir it around until dissolved.

After removing the bagels from the oven, preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Gently drop each bagel into the boiling water (1 or 2 at a time for large bagels, 3 or 4 at a time for smaller bagels.  I found that using a spatula is helpful to scoop them off the pan, and slide them right into the water).  Boil bagels on one side for 30 seconds, then gently flip with a spoon or spatula and boil on the other side for another 30 seconds.  Remove the bagels from the water with a slotted spoon or spatula, and place on a cooling rack.  Repeat until all bagels have been boiled.

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(As the bagels come out of the water, this is a good time to sprinkle on any desired toppings. ¬†Or they’re just as good plain!)

Once the bagels have fully drained off, place them back on the parchment-lined baking sheets.
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Bake in a 400 degree oven for 15-20 minutes (20-25 for larger bagels) or until golden brown.  Remove from the oven and transfer to a cooling rack.

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Once cooled, you can store your bagels in an airtight bag or container for a few days on the counter.  My suggestion is freezing any that you want to last more than 3 or 4 days.  Pull them out one at a time as desired, heat in a microwave for 20-30 seconds, and enjoy!

Gluten-free Lemon Bars

Healthy Gluten-Free Lemon Bars

Mmm…. It all began when I asked my husband what kinds of desserts he might want me to make, and he mentioned lemon bars.¬† I nearly forgot about the little gems!¬† So I went online and found some inspiration for making gluten-free lemon bars (and for making lemon bars, in general.¬† I’d only ever eaten them! ūüôā ).¬† My health-nut side kicked in, and I really wanted to make them as low-carb and low-sugar as possible.¬† This has been a repeat recipe, and it’s one that will show up many times again.¬† So indulge yourself in these luciously sweet and tart treats.¬† With prunes, coconut, and flax seed meal, you might even say they’re good for you!

Crust:

1 c. prunes (about 20)

2 Tbl. canola oil

1/4 c. flax seed meal

1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/2 c. unsweetened shredded coconut

1/2 tsp. baking powder

1/4 tsp. salt

1/4 c. all-purpose gluten-free flour

Filling:

3/4 c. lemon juice (3-5 lemons)

1 tsp. lemon zest

1/2 c. honey

4 eggs

1 Tbl. sorghum flour (or a-p GF flour)

2 Tbl. tapioca starch

In a food processor, combine all ingredients for crust.  (If you do not have a food processor, like myself, a blender does the trick.  First, combine flax meal, cinnamon, coconut, baking powder, salt, and flour in a separate bowl.  In the blender, combine the prunes and canola oil until prunes are finely chopped.  Then slowly add in dry ingredients.  If ingredients are getting stuck, transfer to a bowl to continue combining by hand.)

Oil the bottom and sides of an 8×8 or 9×9 baking dish.¬† Pour in crust mixture, and using your hands or the back of a spoon, press the crust firmly into the bottom of the baking dish.¬† Bake at 350 degrees for 10-12 minutes.¬† Remove from oven.

While the crust is baking, place all ingredients for the filling (except lemon juice) into the blender.  Blend until smooth.  While the blender is running, slowly stream in the lemon juice.  Pour the filling mixture over the warm crust.

Return pan to the oven for 20-25 minutes, or until the the lemon mixture is set.

Remove from the oven, and cool completely.¬† Top with shredded coconut, if desired.¬† Personally, I like enjoying my lemon bars after they’ve chilled in the refrigerator for a few hours.¬† But, by all means, dig right in!

Makes 12-16 lemon bars

Gluten-free Chocolate Chip Coconut Scones

Scones?¬† Gluten-free?¬† Yes, please!¬† This recipes is originally from Elana over at http://www.elanaspantry.com/paleo-chocolate-chip-scones/. ¬†She’s got tons of great recipes, many of which are Paleo.¬† If you’re into that, check her out!¬† I made a few changes because I don’t generally have vegan shortening on hand, and well, I love coconut, so I added a little bit of that ūüôā¬† Enjoy!

1/2 c. coconut flour

1/4 tsp. salt

1/4 tsp. baking soda

1/4 c. butter

1/4 c. honey

4 eggs @ room temp.

1/2 c. dark chocolate chips (Nestle has soy-free dark chocolate chips)

1/4 c. unsweetened shredded coconut

Combine coconut flour, salt, and baking soda.

Combine butter, honey, and eggs.  Add mixture to dry ingredients until incorporated.

Stir in chocolate chips and shredded coconut.

Spoon dough onto baking sheet in desired amounts (I got about 8 small scones out of my batch).

Bake at 350 degrees for 12-15 minutes or until lightly golden.

*Note:¬† If you do not have coconut flour on hand (which is a bit on the pricey side, but totally worth it, because you only use a small amount in most recipes), do NOT substitute with another flour 1:1.¬† Coconut flour soaks up liquid like crazy, so you only need a little.¬† If you must substitute with another GF flour, I would suggest starting with 1 cup, and increasing 1/4 cup of flour as needed until you get a cookie-dough-like consistency.¬† Generally, I’ve found coconut flour to other GF flours to be 1:3.